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ABOUT YCUA

Mission Statement - To provide top quality, cost effective, environmentally safe water
and wastewater services to our customers.

The Ypsilanti Community Utilities Authority (YCUA) provides water and wastewater services to the Ypsilanti area. Water and/or wastewater services are provided to the City of Ypsilanti, Charter Township of Ypsilanti, Pittsfield Township, Augusta Township, Sumpter Township and Superior Township. YCUA contracts with the Western Townships Utilities Authority (WTUA) to provide wastewater treatment services for the Townships of Canton, Northville, and Plymouth.

Annually, YCUA processes over eight billion gallons of sewage at the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) located at McGregor and State Streets near Willow Run Airport. YCUA delivers five billion gallons of water each year. In the City of Ypsilanti and Ypsilanti Township, YCUA delivers services directly to homes and businesses (approximately 22,000). In the other communities, YCUA contracts to provide wholesale water and wastewater services.

The annual operating budget for the Authority is approximately $38 million. The capital budget for fiscal year 2012 - 2013 was approximately $14.5 million, consisting primarily of improvements to selected sewage pumping stations and replacement of old water main. Delivering water to our customers and collecting and treating the wastewater generated are the primary functions of the Authority. Assuring the continued viability of our existing infrastructure and planning for the future water and wastewater needs of our communities is a vital function.

Growth within WTUA service area resulted in a request to expand the WWTP to treat the additional wastewater generated in their communities. Construction on the WWTP expansion and improvements project, which added 17 MGD capacity to the facility, began in 2002 and was completed during 2006. Following completion of the expansion project, the WWTP is now rated to treat 51.2 million gallons of wastewater per day.

Many water and sewer mains within Ypsilanti and Ypsilanti Township are identified as needing replacement, either because of age or inadequate size. These replacements are being scheduled as time and funds permit.

Above-ground investments include four ground-level water storage tanks and two water towers including the famous stone tower near the campus of Eastern Michigan University.

Average water use is 11 million gallons a day. In the summer, use may exceed 23 million gallons in a single day.

In keeping with our mission to provide top quality, cost effective, environmentally safe water and wastewater services to our customers, YCUA is continually upgrading its infrastructure. Recent improvements include:

Smokler-Textile Subdivision Water Supply Improvements - Completed during 2013, the scope of work included replacement or installation of approximately 10,500 feet of water main and appurtenances along with repairs to isolated portions of the wastewater collection system. The total project cost is estimated at $2.14 million and was primarily funded through a Drinking Water Revolving Fund (DWRF) loan program administered by the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ).

2013 Water Main and Paving Improvements - Substantially completed during 2013, the scope of utility work included replacement or installation of approximately 15,000 feet of water main and appurtenances along with repairs to isolated portions of the wastewater collection system in the neighborhoods between I-94 and Grove Road west of Rawsonville Road as well as the streets south of Holmes Road between Willow Run High School and Wiard Road. The utility improvements were constructed in conjunction with road and drainage improvements implemented by the Washtenaw County Road Commission (WCRC) on behalf of the Charter Township of Ypsilanti. Total water supply and wastewater related project costs are estimated at $3.9 million.

WWTP Retention Basin Header and Septage Receiving Station Improvements - Started during 2013, the scope of work includes replacement of the pumps and piping associated with the retention basin discharge header. The existing pumps and piping were installed as part of the original wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) construction and are both past their design life as well as being undersized. Improvements to the septage receiving station include installation of screening equipment and flow meters upstream of the existing pumps. The pumps were installed as part of the recent WWTP expansion but have been prone to clogging due to rags and other debris introduced by the various septage haulers that discharge to the facility. Total project costs are estimated at just over $1,200,000. The project is being financed by a low-interest State Revolving Fund (SRF) loan administered by the MDEQ.

Golfside Drive Water Main Improvements - Completed during 2012, the project consisted of replacing approximately 2,000 feet of existing water main on Golfside Drive between Washtenaw Avenue and Clark Road in the Charter Township of Ypsilanti. The project also included improvements to approximately 2,000 feet of wastewater force main pipe and was completed in conjunction with road improvements made by the WCRC. Project costs totaled just over $900,000.

Ecorse / Emerick / I-94 Water Main Improvements - Started during 2012 and completed during 2013, the project consisted of replacing approximately 14,500 feet of aging and undersized water main in the area bounded by Ecorse Road, Harris Road, I-94 and Emerick Street in the Charter Township of Ypsilanti. The work was completed in advance of road improvements made by the WCRC. Project costs totaled approximately $2,050,000.

West Cross Water Supply System Improvements - Completed during 2012, the project consisted of replacement of approximately 1,800 feet of aging and undersized water main in West Cross Street between Washtenaw Avenue and Wallace Boulevard in the City of Ypsilanti. The work was completed in conjunction with road improvements made by the City of Ypsilanti. Project costs totaled approximately $460,000.

Factory Street Pump Station Improvements - Started during 2012, the scope of work includes removal and replacement of the existing screening equipment, all five existing pumps, the permanent standby generators, and new controls and instrumentation at the Factory Street Pump Station in the City of Ypsilanti. Total project costs are estimated at $2,720,000. The project is being financed by a low-interest SRF loan.

WWTP Plant Effluent Water Upgrades - Completed during 2013, the scope of work included removal and replacement of the existing pumps installed as part of the original WWTP construction along with installation of new pumps in the tertiary filter building constructed as part of the recent WWTP expansion. Project costs totaled approximately $1,600,000 and were financed by a low-interest SRF loan.

Snow Road Pump Station Improvements - Started during 2011 and completed during 2013, the scope of work included removal and replacement of the existing screening equipment, all five existing pumps, the permanent standby generators, and new controls and instrumentation at the Snow Road Pump Station in the Charter Township of Ypsilanti. Total project costs are estimated at $3,495,000. The project was financed by a low-interest SRF loan.

Holmes Road Phase 3 Water Main Replacement - This project consisted of replacing approximately 5,000 feet of existing water mains on Holmes Road between Spencer Lane and Michigan Avenue in the Charter Township of Ypsilanti. The work was completed in 2011 in conjunction with road improvements made by the Washtenaw County Road Commission. Total project costs are estimated at $1,080,000.

Ford Boulevard Water Main Replacement - This 2011 project consisted of replacing approximately 1,500 feet of aging and undersized water main on Ford Boulevard between Parkwood Avenue and Russell Street in the Charter Township of Ypsilanti. The work was completed in advance of road improvements to be made by the Washtenaw County Road Commission. Total project costs are estimated at $406,000.

East Cross Water Supply System Improvements - This project consisted of replacement of water services, hydrants, and valves on the existing water main in East Cross Street between River Street and Prospect Street in the City of Ypsilanti. The work was completed in 2011 in conjunction with road improvements made by the City of Ypsilanti. Total project costs are estimated at $180,000.

College Place Water Supply Improvements - This 2010 project consisted of abandoning approximately 600 feet of aging and undersized water main on College Place between Cross Street and Forest Avenue along with installation of a double check valve assembly. The work was completed in conjunction with road improvements made by the City of Ypsilanti. Project costs totaled approximately $85,000.

Mansfield Avenue Water Main Improvements Phase 2 - This project consisted of replacing approximately 1,750 feet of aging and undersized water main within the Mansfield Avenue right-of-way between Westmoreland Street and South Congress Street in the City of Ypsilanti. The work was completed in 2010 in conjunction with road improvements made by the City of Ypsilanti and Washtenaw County Road Commission. Project costs totaled approximately $240,000.

2010 Sanitary Sewer Lining - This project consisted of cured-in-place lining of approximately 2,700 feet of sanitary sewers in the City of Ypsilanti. Project costs totaled approximately $79,000.

Washtenaw Rear Yard Sanitary Sewer Emergency Repair - This project consisted of pipe-bursting of approximately 75 feet of damaged sanitary sewer located along rear property lines of parcels east of Courtland Street between Washtenaw Avenue and Whittier Street in the City of Ypsilanti. Completed in 2010, project costs totaled approximately $72,000.

Energy Process and Optimization - This project consisted of heating and ventilation system modifications and improvements at the Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) and at four large tributary sewage pumping stations, replacement of light fixtures and luminaries at the WWTP, modifications to hot water boilers used for heating the WWTP buildings, as well as related electrical and mechanical work. The intent of the project was to lower energy use and costs and thereby achieve reduction in use of natural resources, carbon footprint and achieve cost savings for customers. The project is expected to result in a $585,000 reduction in energy costs per year, a savings of nearly 20% of the operating costs for the WWTP. The project was funded by a low-interest State Revolving Fund (SRF) loan administered by the MDEQ with additional assistance provided by the American Recover and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA), which allowed the amount of the loan repayment to be reduced by 40%. Completed in 2009, project costs totaled approximately $1,150,000 of which the Authority will be responsible for $690,000 after principal forgiveness.

Martz Pump Station Improvements - This project consisted of modifications to increase the capacity of the station from 14.5 MGD to 22.4 MGD in accordance with the Authority Sanitary Sewer Master Plan. The three existing pumps were replaced with four new pumps each rated for 7.5 MGD flow capacity. Other improvements included replacement of the existing comminutor, all suction and discharge piping including valve and flow meter replacement, addition of a second redundant discharge header, yard piping, new standby power generator sized to run all four new pumps, and related electrical and controls improvements.

Willow Run Pump Station Improvements - This project consisted of replacing the four existing pumps with new pumps rated for the same flow capacity, replacing the existing comminutor, all suction and discharge piping including valves and flow meters, addition of a second redundant discharge header, yard piping, and related electrical and controls improvements. The improvements at the Martz Road and Willow Run pump stations were funded by an SRF loan with assistance provided by the ARRA. Completed in 2009, combined project costs for the Martz Road and Willow Run stations totaled approximately $5,075,000 of which the Authority will be responsible for $3,045,000 after principal forgiveness.

Duncan Pump Station Improvements - This project consisted of complete replacement of the existing ejector type pump station built in the 1950s. It included new submersible pumps, electrical and mechanical equipment and alternate power source for emergency power outages.

Emerick Pump Station Improvements - This project consisted of complete replacement of the existing ejector type pump station built in the 1960s. It included new submersible pumps, electrical and mechanical equipment and alternate power source for emergency power outages. The improvements at the Duncan and Emerick pump stations were funded by an SRF loan with assistance provided by the ARRA. Completed in 2009, combined project costs for the Duncan and Emerick stations totaled approximately $870,000 of which the Authority will be responsible for $522,000 after principal forgiveness.

Perrin Street Sanitary Sewer Improvements - This 2009 project consisted of replacement of approximately 180 feet of aging, undersized and damaged sanitary sewer on Perrin Street south of West Cross Street in the City of Ypsilanti. Project costs totaled approximately $64,000.

Hewitt Road Water Main - This project consisted of replacing approximately 1,800 feet of aging and undersized water main on Hewitt Road from Packard Road to just north of Washtenaw Avenue in the Charter Township of Ypsilanti. The work was completed in conjunction with road improvements made by the Washtenaw County Road Commission. Completed in 2009, the project was funded by a DWRF loan with assistance provided by the ARRA. Project costs totaled approximately $650,000 of which the Authority will be responsible for $390,000 after principal forgiveness.

Mansfield Avenue Water Main Improvements - This 2009 project consisted of replacing approximately 1,300 feet of aging and undersized water main within the Mansfield Avenue right-of-way between Washtenaw Avenue and Westmoreland Street in the City of Ypsilanti. The work was completed in conjunction with road improvements made by the City of Ypsilanti. The project was funded by a DWRF loan with assistance provided by the ARRA. Project costs totaled approximately $260,000 of which the Authority will be responsible for $156,000 after principal forgiveness.

Bridge Road Ground Storage Reservoir Improvements - This project consisted of repairs to and repainting of one of the two 5,000,000 gallon ground storage reservoirs adjacent to North Hydro Park in the Charter Township of Ypsilanti. Completed in 2009, project costs totaled approximately $230,000.

Holmes Road Phase 2 - This 2008 project consisted of replacing approximately 6,800 feet of aging water mains on Holmes Road between Rue Deauville and Spencer Avenue. The work was completed in conjunction with road improvements made by the Washtenaw County Road Commission. The project was funded by a low-interest Drinking Water Revolving Fund (DWRF) loan administered by the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ). Project costs totaled approximately $1,290,000.

City Housing Water Main Improvements - This project consisted of replacing approximately 2,500 feet of aging and undersized water mains within the public housing complex southeast of the intersection of First Street and Harriet Street in the City of Ypsilanti. The work was completed in conjunction with paving improvements made by the City of Ypsilanti. The project was funded by a DWRF loan. Completed in 2008, project cost totaled approximately $460,000.

Clark and Devon Water Main Improvements - This 2008 project consisted of improvements to water supply and wastewater systems along Clark Road, west of Devon Street. The work was completed in conjunction with improvements by Superior Township. Completed in 2008, project costs totaled approximately $139,000.

Holmes Road Ground Storage Reservoir Improvements - This project consisted of repairs to and repainting of the 2,000,000 gallon ground storage reservoir north of Holmes Road west of Ridge Road in the Charter Township of Ypsilanti. Completed in 2008, project costs totaled approximately $250,000.

2008 Sanitary Sewer Lining - This project consisted of cured-in-place lining of approximately 7,800 feet of sanitary sewers in both the Charter Township of Ypsilanti and the City of Ypsilanti. Project costs totaled approximately $250,000.

YCUA

ADMINISTRATION DEPARTMENT

The YCUA Director is responsible for supervising the administration and operation of the maintenance department, service department, and wastewater treatment plant. This administrator exercises supervision over departmental Directors and their functions in accordance with approved policies and procedures of the Authority. The Director also manages general operation and maintenance of all systems, equipment, and facilities owned or operated by YCUA.

YCUA's Director provides leadership and direction in the evaluation and development of short and long range plans for the organization and its departmental directors, acting as a member of the Authority’s collective bargaining committee, planning and organizing capital improvement projects, developing and ensuring implementation of Authority policies and procedures, and overseeing effective and efficient use of budgeted funds, personnel, material, facilities, and time.

The YCUA Director oversees the Authority's compliance with all federal, state, and local regulations, requirements, and permits. The Director initiates and recommends new and / or improved practices and determines system and equipment improvements and additions. The Director works with the department heads in the development and implementation of capital and operating budgets and the Director of Finance with financial duties such as controlling the expenditure of budgeted funds and recommending approval for expenditures.

YCUA's Director confers with engineering consultants, suppliers, and governmental regulatory officials to determine operating needs, training assistance, and staffing. The Director interprets and applies personnel and other administrative policies and procedures of the Authority including applicable collective bargaining provisions and work rules. The Director also maintains effective communications and working relationships with employees, governmental officials, and the general public.

The YCUA Director attends all Board of Commissioners' meetings to provide explanations of pertinent matters to the Board.

YCUA

HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT

YCUA’s Human Resources Department is responsible for and entrusted with the overall administration and strategy development for the Authority’s human resources policies, procedures, and programs for approximately 112 employees. These include, but are not limited to: all company benefits and insurances; complete timekeeping, attendance, compensation and payroll administration; employee relations; labor relations with two unions; employee specific and organization wide training, development and evaluation; staffing and recruitment using both internal and external processes, as required; and ensuring all occupational safety practices are in compliance with applicable regulatory standards. This department ensures all policies, procedures and programs are in compliance with both state and federal laws. YCUA is an equal opportunity employer.

YCUA

FINANCE DEPARTMENT

YCUA's Director of Finance is responsible for the management of the accounting department, maximizing the return of the financial assets of YCUA, directing and evaluating the fiscal functions and performance of YCUA, establishing and maintaining financial policies, procedures, internal controls, and reporting systems; and ensuring legal and regulatory compliance of all accounting and financial reporting functions.

The invoices of the Authority are paid once per month after approval at the Board of Commissioners' regular meeting.

YCUA

CUSTOMER SERVICE DEPARTMENT

The Customer Service Department manages approximately 24,000 accounts. Staffing is comprised of billing staff, receipts staff, collections staff, and an accounts receivable coordinator. The billing staff processes meter-reads to produce bi-monthly bills for the community. They also schedule requests for service and address any concerns our customers may have about their account. The receipts staff processes all payments that come to the Authority including those received by mail, in person, and electronic remittances. The collections staff assists customers in payment of their past due bills. This includes making payment arrangements and working with various outside agencies that help customers in need. The accounts receivable coordinator manages all billing for commercial and industrial customers of YCUA as well as the area Contract Communities for which YCUA provides water and sewer services. These accounts are billed monthly and are closely monitored due to the size of their consumption and revenues.

If you have any questions about your service, need to report a problem, such as a leak in the system or a meter, or want to have service started, call 734.484.4600 and press "0" for the operator. Customer Service can handle any request for new service or service changes during normal business hours of 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

YCUA

ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT

YCUA's Engineering Department is responsible for project planning, project management, engineering design supervision, and construction supervision for YCUA-funded projects as well as review of engineering plans for water supply and wastewater improvements constructed as part of community development projects. These projects include developments of residential subdivisions, commercial properties, and industrial properties in the communities.

YCUA

COMPLIANCE DEPARTMENT

The Compliance Department consists of the Authority’s laboratory operations and source control programs. The laboratory is responsible for the analysis of samples from the wastewater treatment plant and various industrial and commercial sources to ensure compliance with local, state, and federal requirements. Laboratory operations are conducted eight hours per day, 365 days a year. Source control primarily includes the Industrial Pretreatment and Fats, Oil, and Grease (FOG) Mitigation Programs.

The purpose of the Industrial Pretreatment Program is to assure that non-domestic users located in the Authority’s wastewater service area are in compliance with the local sewer use ordinance. Conditions of discharge and pollutant limits established in the ordinance are designed to protect the sewage collection system, the wastewater treatment plant, and worker safety.

The purpose of the FOG Mitigation Program is to reduce the persistent problem of pipe blockages and sanitary sewer overflows in our community caused entirely, or in part, by the excessive discharge of FOG from food service establishments. Sanitary sewer overflows can adversely affect public and environmental health. When FOG is discharged to the sanitary sewer, it can collect on the wall of pipes and become as hard as concrete. Non-domestic users located in the City and Township of Ypsilanti classified as a food service establishment are monitored through the Authority’s FOG Mitigation Program.

YCUA

MAINTENANCE DEPARTMENT

The YCUA Maintenance Department provides maintenance and technical support to the other departments of the Authority. This department provides continuous and reliable service for the community through professional skilled trades in plumbing, electrical, millwrighting, carpentry, masonry, welding, and custodial groundskeeping. The team maintains a network of more than 60 satellite locations, including 47 sewage pump station that safely transfer the wastewater to the treatment plant, 13 potable water distribution stations that provide a continuous supply of water to the community, metering vaults, water tanks, and the wastewater treatment plant.

The Maintenance Department's responsibilities range from the changing of a light bulb to closing 480-volt substation breakers and servicing electric motors from a computer cooling fan to a 4,160-volt, 2,250-horsepower blower motor. Maintenance staff performs welding and fabrication of material needed at a moment’s notice, diagnostics and analysis of complex circuits and program support of programmable logic controllers, and building structural maintenance, esthetics, housekeeping, and groundskeeping.

The maintenance and repair of pump stations sometimes requires entry into confined spaces as deep as 42 feet below ground. Pump station callouts are often in the middle of storms and at odd hours of the night, sometimes requiring staff to provide emergency backup power for days. Inside jobs can be just as challenging with ambient temperatures inside the pump stations or the wastewater plant incinerator that are above 100º F in the summer. Some of the jobs are particularly strenuous without the impact of the weather. Removal of large pumps or equipment requires the rigging of hoisting equipment and heavy manual labor by all the members of the team.

Reporting to the Director of Maintenance Operations, the Maintenance Department Supervisor is the first in line for emergency response. Duties are to provide professional and efficient services to the community while maintaining the assets of the Authority. This individual prioritizes job assignments and is the team leader providing support to the staff. The Maintenance Department Supervisor insures that personnel work safely and have the proper training and support. This individual also provides documentation of payroll and personnel information to human resources and assists in finding product resources and acquisition at a competitive price.

The Chief Stockroom Clerk oversees and maintains more than 8,000 items of inventory worth over $1.3 million. The Clerk generates purchase requisitions, documents the wastewater plant power usage, and maintains gas usage and septic hauler discharger logs. The Chief Stockroom Clerk's broad knowledge of parts and the various vendors to secure these needed parts is priceless.

The Fleet Mechanic is responsible for the upkeep and repair of all vehicles owned and operated by the Authority. This individual's duties expand to include all mowing and operation of groundskeeping equipment such as weed whips, chain saws, tractors, and backhoe. The Fleet Mechanic is also responsible for natural gas, gasoline, and diesel-powered equipment such as pumps, emergency backup generators, and power blowers.

The Maintenance Department’s Mechanics' responsibilities are to troubleshoot, repair, and install new equipment; carry out preventive maintenance, and respond to emergency callouts 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The average time required for on-the-job training for an effective Maintenance Mechanic is five years. After that, a Mechanic has acquired enough knowledge to pass a skilled trades journeyman examination in multiple fields, having developed skills in the Electrictrical, Electronics Repair, Machine Repair, Pipe Fitting, and Millwright Trades. These Mechanics must also be familiar with and follow all federal, state, and local codes and regulation.

The largest portion of the physical labor required to complete a job assignment is performed by the Maintenance Helper. In many instances, the Maintenance Helper will perform job assignments without the assistance or the physical presence of the Maintenance Mechanic or a Maintenance Supervisor. This position is generally considered the training position that eventually leads to a classification promotion as a Maintenance Mechanic. They are expected to learn and perform all of the skills required of a Maintenance Mechanic and assist the Maintenance Mechanics in all areas. Their role is much more than tool-chaser. The Maintenance Helpers' input on job procedures is a vital part of the completion of an assignment. The Authority supports and provides training to the Mechanics and Helpers for license and certifications recognized by the State of Michigan and the Michigan Water Environment Association (MWEA) for Mechanical, Electrical, Arc Flash, Confined Space, Overhead Crane, Man Lift, Fork Lift, and Fall Arrest and Rescue.

The Custodian / Groundskeeper classification is one of the entry-level positions for the Authority. This position performs painting, cleaning, mowing, snow removal, recycling, landfill dumping, and general custodial duties. The individuals hired into this position are far more qualified to perform jobs at the Authority than the simple tasks given to them daily and, as higher-level positions become available, they will move on to become even more of an asset to the Authority and the community.

YCUA

SERVICE, WATER DISTRIBUTION, AND METER DEPARTMENT

The Service and Water Distribution Departments are responsible for monitoring and maintaining the water and sewer transmission lines throughout the City of Ypsilanti and Ypsilanti Township. These departments are located at the Service Center, 2780 Clark Road, in Ypsilanti Township. This group of employees installs and repairs numerous water or sewer lines each year. There is approximately 300 miles of water and sewer mains that crews maintain. Crews also assure that the sewers are clear of debris by routinely inspecting, cleaning and flushing the sewer mains with combination sewer cleaning / vacuuming machine. YCUA crews will fix an average of 200 breaks of water and sewer lines and install water and sewer taps. In the spring and early summer, YCUA crews will repair sidewalks and right-of-ways damaged during any repair procedures; roads are repaired in the fall. In order to provide the necessary maintenance, the Service department has 25 employees and approximately 30 vehicles and pieces of equipment.

The Water Distribution Department of six employees monitors and makes adjustments to the water system that services the City of Ypsilanti, Ypsilanti Township, Pittsfield Township, Augusta Township, and Superior Township. The Water Department no longer produces water from the deep wells that were located in the City and Township and purchases all of its water from the City of Detroit's water system. However, in order to provide water supply and adequate pressure, our operators are operating valves, pumps and filling storage tanks during low use periods, and using other methods to assure the most efficient water service to our customers. Annually over four billion gallons of water are pumped through the YCUA water distribution system.

The Cross Connection Control Program, mandated by the Environmental Protection Agency and the State of Michigan Department of Environmental Quality is very important to the health and safety of all of the people that drink water in our community. This program requires us to inspect or to certify inspections made by licensed plumbers of water line connections between clean (potable) water and potentially harmful (non-potable) water supplies.

The Ypsilanti Community Utilities Authority has nearly 22,000 water accounts in the city and the township that require a water meter to measure the amount of water that each customer uses. These meters range in sizes from 5/8 inch to 10 inches in diameter.

The Meter Service Department's nine employees perform an important service to both the citizens of our community and to YCUA. In addition to reading almost 10,000 water meters every month, the department performs other services for YCUA's customers. Some of those services include extra or final reads for real-estate closings, turning water off and on for plumbing repairs, installing new meters and outside readers, flushing a customer's service line to make sure that the line is clear of debris left from construction, and, at a customer's request, checking for plumbing system leaks when a customer receives an unusually high water bill. Our service personnel handle on the average of 900 to 1,000 of these requests every month.

Unlike other utilities, we cannot remove meters from the inside of homes because of the cold winter temperatures in Michigan. For this reason, we have started a meter exchange program using the latest in metering technology. With the new type of meters, readings can be obtained from the outside. This results in less inconvenience to our customers and allows our employees to read more meters in less time. While it is still necessary to enter a home or business to replace a meter, once they are installed, we rarely will be required to re-enter a home or business.

For your safety, always request proper ID when YCUA employees ask to enter your home in order to access your water meter.

Our billing system collects information necessary to bill our customers fairly and to maintain this equipment so that the customer pays a fair amount for the water and sewer services they receive. YCUA receives the revenue necessary to maintain the high level of services that our customers expect and deserve.

We strive to respond to all of our customer needs and maintain our high level of service to you.

YCUA

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YCUA

Ypsilanti Community Utilities Authority
2777 State Road, Ypsilanti, Michigan 48198-9112
734-484-4600

YCUA

Copyright © 2002 Ypsilanti Community Utilities Authority. All Rights Reserved.